Backyard deer hunting

Inexpensive food from the outdoors

Taking Urban Deer Not As Easy as One Might Think

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Two good-eating size backyard deer taken with a Stryker crossbow.

Two good-eating size backyard deer taken with a Stryker crossbow.

 

 

   Some, who have never done it, disparage urban deer hunting as

I like the large cuts and flight of the Grim Reaper heads as seen on this hog.

I like the large cuts and flight of the Grim Reaper heads as seen on this hog.

 “having no challenge” or being like “shooting a pet dog” or other similar remarks. Like any other deer hunting, safely taking urban deer during legal shooting hours requires proper selection of hunting tools, scouting, careful stand placement, paying attention to food sources and even more than normal care about shooting directions and arrow flight.

  The first time I set up on this property near a pond, I saw deer and two hogs moving through a thick patch of Privet hedge; but nothing came into the open during daylight hours.  The property owner suggested that I set up in an open area in an adjoining wood lot that had some white oaks. I put my climbing stand on a tree at about 2:00 PM.  About an hour later I saw the first of what later turned out to be a group of 10 deer coming to feed.

 I watched one and then the other, waiting for any deer to step into an area that was sufficiently clear to loose an arrow.  A doe stepped into a trail, and I shot her at about 35 yards. I heard the “whomp” of a hit, saw her run and heard the crash as it went down. I used the crank to re-cock the crossbow and put another arrow in the barrel.

  The remainder of the herd settled down. A small buck approached within 15 yards. It was facing me. When it gave me a slight angle shot, I put the arrow through the heart by firing down between the shoulder blade and the ribs.  This powerful crossbow drove the carbon arrow completely through the 90-pound deer.

Author's dogs (L-R) Demeter, Diana and Ursus enjoying their boiled deer bones after playing a vital part in the hunt.

Author's dogs (L-R) Demeter, Diana and Ursus enjoying their boiled deer bones after playing a vital part in the hunt.

 Neither shot gave good blood. I followed up the first deer, but did not see it in the thick overgrowth and briers. I went home and got my canine deer-recovery team. Ursus quickly sniffed out my blooded arrow, and Demeter and Diana almost instantly located my deer.

A neck roast with potatoes and carrots. The first fresh meat of the season.

A neck roast with potatoes and carrots. The first fresh meat of the season.

  By midnight I had the two deer skinned, cut up and in my cooler. The next day I packaged the meat and froze it. The following day I made sausage and deer burger. I had a neck roast for supper, and my dogs enjoyed their boiled deer bones.  

 These deer were taken from my home town about a mile from the court-house square. This hunt is typical. I have set up in people’s back yards, sometimes for several days, but no deer came out before dark or approached within range of my archery equipment. The first deer I shot was walking, and the hit was at about the mid-point of the deer.  Even so, those large cuts killed quickly.  The deer was down six seconds later after having covered about 30 yards.

  Stryker crossbow furnished by Bow Tech and Grim Reaper points provided by manufacturer.

Written by hoveysmith

October 6, 2009 at 8:26 am

Posted in Uncategorized

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